Hawaii Volcano National Park

Hawaii Volcano National Park - Current Update

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Monday, August 20, 2018, 1:52 PM HST (Monday, August 20, 2018, 23:52 UTC)
KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE
Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

Seismicity and ground deformation are negligible at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. On the volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), only a few ocean entries are oozing lava; laze plumes are minimal. Sulfur dioxide emission rates at both the summit and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is lower than at any time since late 2007.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) will continue to closely monitor Kīlauea's seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintain visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ.

HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed. The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.




Source: Cascade Range Current Update




Kilauea Volcano Cam


This is a static image of Kilauea, The VolcanoCam image automatically updates approximately every two hours.
Volcano image courtesy of ...
Live webcam images of various Hawaii volcanoes
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Webcam

Kilauea Latest Entrie

August 20, 2018
Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) team assessed conditions at the fissure 8 cone and upper lava channel on August 17, 2018. At the time of the flight, the lava pond within the cone had crusted over with no observed incandescence. The reddish-brown rock inside the cone is the result of oxidation; the interaction of heated rock and gases causes black basaltic cinders to change color, similar to rust forming on metal.
This morning, USGS scientists flying over fissure 8 noticed a change in the vent from yesterday. Gas jets were throwing spatter—fragments of glassy lava (light gray deposits)—from small incandescent areas deep within the cone. This activity is an indication that the lower East Rift Zone eruption may be paused rather than pau (over).

Source: Kilauea Volcano Observatory

Information courtesy of ...
U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO).
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